We found 54 results for the keyword:
  • What are NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum?
    • NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum is a nicotine gum and is used as a stop smoking aid.

  • How do I use NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum?
    • Fresh Mint gum should be used whenever there is an urge to smoke according to the “chew and rest” technique described on the pack. After about 30 minutes of such use, the gum will be exhausted. Not more than 15 pieces of the chewing gum may be used each day.

  • How does NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum work?
    • NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum delivers therapeutic nicotine to the body to help fight cigarette cravings.

  • How long can I take NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum for?
    • NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum can be used for up to three months to break the habit of smoking, then gradually reduce gum use. When daily use is 1-2 gums, use should be stopped. Any spare gum should be retained, as craving may suddenly return.

      Those who have quit smoking but are having difficulty discontinuing using the gum are recommended to seek additional help and advice from a healthcare professional.

  • What is the shelf life for NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum?
    • 24 months.

  • What is the age range for NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum?
    • NiQuitin Fresh Mint Gum is not recommended for use in children under 12 years of age.

  • What are NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum classification? (e.g. medical device)
    • A licenced medicine

  • Can NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum be taken with other medication?
    • No clinically relevant interactions between nicotine replacement therapy and other drugs have definitely been established, however nicotine may possibly enhance the haemodynamic effects of adenosine. Smoking cessation itself may require the adjustment of some drug therapy.

  • Who should not use NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum?
    • You should not use NiQuitin Fresh Mint Gum if you are allergic to any of the ingredients listed

  • Are NiQuitin Fresh Mint gum safe while pregnant or breast-feeding?
    • A Stopping smoking is the single most effective intervention for improving the health of both the pregnant smoker and her baby, and the earlier abstinence is achieved the better. However, if the mother cannot (or is considered unlikely to) quit without pharmacological support, NRT may be used as the risk to the foetus is lower than that expected with smoking tobacco. Stopping completely is by far the best option but NRT may be used in pregnancy as a safer alternative to smoking. Because of the potential for nicotine-free periods, intermittent dose forms are preferable, but patches may be necessary if there is significant nausea and/or vomiting. If patches are used they should, if possible, be removed at night when the foetus would not normally be exposed to nicotine. Breastfeeding The relatively small amounts of nicotine found in breast milk during NRT use are less hazardous to the infant than second-hand smoke. Intermittent dose forms would minimize the amount of nicotine in breast milk and permit feeding when levels were at their lowest.